comment

FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS OVER $100 - US ONLY

Cart 0

1.7" Tylosaurus Mosasaur, Squalicorax Shark Fossil Tooth In Matrix Dinosaur Era COA

38.99

Location: Oued Zem, Morocco

Weight: 6.6 Ounces

Dimensions: 3.6 Inches Long, 2.4 Inches Wide, 1.7 Inches Thick (Matrix)

Mosasaur Tooth Dimensions: 1.7 Inches Long, 0.1 Inch Wide

Shark Tooth Dimensions: 1.1 Inch Long, 0.7 Inches Wide

Comes with a Certificate of Authenticity. 

The item pictured is the one you will receive.

This is a genuine fossil.

100 - 66 Million Years old, Upper Cretaceous, Maastrichtian Epoch.


Tylosaurus is a genus of large marine reptiles known as mosasaurs that lived during the Late Cretaceous period, approximately 85 to 65 million years ago. These creatures were apex predators and are considered to be among the largest mosasaurs ever discovered. While Tylosaurus fossils have been found in various parts of the world, including North America, Europe, and Australia, there is no evidence to suggest that Tylosaurus specifically inhabited Morocco.

Morocco, located in North Africa, has a rich fossil record that includes a diverse range of prehistoric marine life. However, the mosasaurs found in Morocco belong to different genera, such as Prognathodon and Mosasaurus, rather than Tylosaurus. These Moroccan mosasaurs share similar characteristics with their counterparts found in other regions but represent distinct species.

Squalicorax pristodontus: Squalicorax pristodontus is an extinct species of crow shark that lived during the Late Cretaceous period. It was one of the largest species within the Squalicorax genus, reaching lengths of up to 4.8 meters (16 feet). The teeth of S. pristodontus were notably large, loosely spaced, and serrated, allowing it to consume relatively large prey and carrion. This species had a global distribution, with remains found in North America, France, the Netherlands, Egypt, Morocco, and Madagascar.



Please be aware of the nature of fossils:

Being buried under the ground for millions of years under tons of pressure tends to be rough. No fossil comes out of the ground whole and perfect. Most fossils have undergone some restoration, while others are altered by man simply to enhance their presentation in different ways. The workers in Morocco do a very professional job, of unearthing and preserving these natural treasures, however, commonly natural cracks are visible on the surface. These are part of the natural beauty of the fossil and are not considered defects.



Share this Product


More from this collection

-->